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Sicily and wines

Publié le par Philippe Josse

Sicily and wines

Sicily

( Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian )

It is one of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean autonomous region. Its capital is the city of Palermo. The flag , the gorgon three legs ( Trinacria ) , represents the three points of the island, western tip of Trapani- Marsala, north-east of Messina and south- east of Syracuse .

Sicily has more vineyards than any other Italian region .

Nearly 70 % of the grapes are white and about 180,000 hectares planted , Sicily produces 8 million hectoliters of wine, 400,000 hl from 20 000 hectares composed by 9 DOC . For comparison Sicily produces more wine than the whole of Australia .

Much of Sicilian wine is produced by cooperatives, but fortunately for years yields have been modified in order to create wines with confirmed characters and typical Sicilian identity.

A number of increasingly important areas of private applies to create wines of excellent quality.

Since antiquity, Sicily was known for the quality of its wines. Sicilian wines have always enjoyed an excellent reputation.

The island has preserved, often intertwined , sumptuous remains of its successive occupants : Phoenician , Greek, Roman , Arab , Norman ...

The Phoenicians were the first to introduce the vine,

Thereafter, the Greeks ( eighth century BC.) , Find a fertile ground in Sicily for the cultivation of the vine and wine and five hundred years of peaceful coexistence they spent on the island, they transform the habits of Sicilians , they became true experts in viticulture

During the Roman period . During the following centuries the church soutena viticulture.

After the advent of Christianity, the Church continued to support viticulture.

With the barbarian invasions ( fifth century AD.) , Production experienced a break

Belisario in the Byzantine 535 AD. BC allowed the Sicilians to focus on agriculture, although it did not last .

Muslim invaders ( 827-878 ) éliminèrent wine production without the ban .

Viticulture returned to the arrival of the Normans , but for reasons of excessive taxes , Charles d'Anjou in 1266 prompted the people to not establish vineyards.

With the Aragonese and the Spanish, agriculture and viticulture were developed significantly.

Late 18th century with English Woodhouse, Sicilian wine production has boomed thanks to the large-scale commercialization of Marsala wines .

Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines
Sicily and wines

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Friuli–Venezia Giulia

Publié le par Philippe Josse

Friuli–Venezia Giulia

Friuli-Venezia Giulia wine

(or Friuli wine) is wine made in the northeastern Italian region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Once part of the Venetian Republic and with sections under the influence of the Austro-Hungarian Empire for some time, the wines of the region have noticeable Slavic and Germanic influences.

There are 11 Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) and Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia area. The region has 3 Indicazione Geografica Tipica (IGT) designations Alto Livenza, delle Venezie and Venezia Giulia. Nearly 62% of the wine produced in the region falls under a DOC designation. The area is known predominantly for its white wines which are considered some of the best examples of Italian wine in that style.

Along with the Veneto and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, the Friuli-Venezia Giulia forms theTre Venezie wine region which ranks with Tuscany and Piedmont as Italy's world class wine regions.

Friuli–Venezia Giulia is Italy's most North-Eastern region. It covers an area of 7,858 km2 and is the fifth smallest region of the country. It borders Austria to the north and Slovenia to the east. To the south it faces the Adriatic Sea and to the west its internal border is with the Veneto region.

The region spans a wide variety of climates and landscapes from the mild Mediterranean climate in the south to Alpine continental in the north. The total area is subdivided into a 42.5% mountainous-alpine terrain in the north, 19.3% is hilly, mostly to the south-east, while the remaining 38.2% comprises the central and coastal plains.

The rivers of the region flow from the North and from Slovenia into the Adriatic. The two main rivers are theTagliamento, which flows west-east in its upper part in the Carnic Alps and then bends into a north-south flow that separates the Julian Alps from Alpine foothills and the Isonzo (Soča slo.) which flows from Slovenia into Italy. The Timavo is an underground river that flows for 38 km from Slovenia and resurfaces near its mouth north-west of Duino.

The region Friuli–Venezia Giulia has a temperate climate. However, due to the terrain's diversity, it varies considerably from one area to another. Walled by the Alps on its northern flank, the region is exposed to air masses from the East and the West. The region receives also the southerly Scirocco from the Adriatic sea, which brings in heavy rainfall. Along the coast the climate is mild and pleasant. Trieste records the smallest temperature differences between winter and summer and between day and night. The climate is Alpine-continental in the mountainous areas, where, in some locations, the coldest winter temperatures in Italy can often be found. The Kras plateau has its own weather and climate, influenced, mostly during autumn and winter, by masses of cold air coming from the North-East. These generate a very special feature of the local climate: the north-easterly wind Bora, which blows over the Gulf of Trieste with gusts occasionally exceeding speeds of 150 km/h.

Friulian: Friûl–Vignesie Julie, Slovene: Furlanija–Julijska krajina, German:Friaul–Julisch Venetien is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The capital is Trieste. It has an area of 7,858 km² and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia (known in English also as Julian March), each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity

Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
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Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia

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Veneto and Wine

Publié le par Philippe Josse

 Veneto and  Wine

Veneto

is one of the main Italian regions in terms of quantitative production of grape, the wines produced in this region are famous in every country of the world. Amarone, Recioto, Soave, Prosecco, Valpolicella and Bardolino, are just few names known all over the world and in most of the cases they do not only identify Veneto's wine but also the Italian one. The most interesting characteristic of Veneto is certainly represented by the fact the success of its wines is mainly determined by the many autochthonous grapes cultivated in the region, both white and red. Garganega, Trebbiano di Soave and Prosecco are among the main grapes used for the production of white wines; Corvina, Rondinella, Molinara and Raboso are the ones mainly used for the production of red wines. The enology of Veneto has a wide ampelographic wealth and territorial differences allowing a production of wines having many qualities, from light and crisp wines up to the most robust and full bodied ones, such as Amarone.

The history of wine in Veneto - just like any other Italian region - begins in very ancient ages, far before the times of Greeks - to whom is usually recognized the introduction of vine in Italy - as it is widely proven by important archaeological discoveries. It is believed vine was present as a wild plant in Veneto since many centuries before Christ and grape was used by the people of those time as a food. The first evidences about wine production in Veneto are dated back to the seventh century BC by the Etruscan-Raetic people, in particular Arusnati. The first important written information about the production of wine in this area are dated back to Roman times, when the wines from Raetia were praised for their qualities. The renowned Raetic wine - produced with Raetic grape - was praised by important authors of the past such as Columella, Celso Aulo Cornelius, Martial, Strabone, Suetonius, Pliny the Elder and, in particular, Virgil who believed this wine to be second only to the famous Falerno.

Another important wine particularly famous after the fall of the Roman empire was Acinatico, a sweet wine which can be considered the real ancestor of Recioto di Soave, Recioto di Gambellara and Recioto della Valpolicella. It was a sweet wine produced with grapes dried on mats and subsequently vinified. Acinatico was so appreciated that Flavius Magnus Aurelius Senator - also known as Cassiodore and mininster of the Ostrogothic king Teodoricus - has left his witness in a writing where he described the qualities of this wine and his highest appreciation. Despite Barbarian people who invaded these lands appreciated these wines, they were also responsible for devastating most of vineyards. It was only in 643 AD the vineyards of Veneto were for the first time and by law protected by a special edict. The Longobard king Rotari promulgated an edict which set penalties to anyone responsible for vineyards damages or was responsible of stealing grapes.

Similar edicts have been promulgated in later times, the cultivation of vine was widely favored and its spreading was so high which also reached the inside walls of many cities. During the Middle Age, the development of viticulture and wine making in Veneto was also determined by the commercial power of Venice, which does not only favored the exportation of Veneto's wines in other countries, it also favored the introduction of foreign wines, in particular the ones from Greece and Cyprus. Venetian merchants - besides importing wine - also introduced new vine species, while promoting its spreading in the neighboring territories, such as Malvasia that from Venice has spread in Friuli Venezia Giulia and Dalmatia. Even the famous glass makers of Murano contributed to the spreading of wine and its best appreciation. The refined bottles and glasses from Murano rapidly spread in the tables of noble people therefore replacing earthenware, silver and pewter containers. The new glass containers were associated with quality wines and in a short time - in simpler and less valued shapes - reached the tables of the common people all over Europe.

With the decay of the commercial power of Venice in the Mediterranean area and in particular in the Eastern countries - around the half of 1500's - the import of Greek wines was drastically reduced while offering an opportunity of development for local wines. It began in this period the fame of the wines from Treviso, Vicenza and, of course, the Valpolicella area. During the sixteenth century the destiny of Veneto's wine was characterized by periods of high appreciation as well as of decay, in particular because of devastations caused by wars and pestilence. In 1709 was recorded an incredible cold season which - because of frosts - destroyed most of vineyards, an event which dramatically changed the viticulture in Veneto. After this catastrophic event the viticulture of Veneto was approximate and the production of wine faced the same destiny. It was only in 1800's that was recorded an attempt in order to start a new development of Veneto's enology by studying the characteristics of the territory and of the grapes which were best suited: a first and important step towards the rebirth of quality.

Despite these new attempts, other dreadful catastrophes were about to happen, not only in Veneto, but all over Europe. Around the half of the 1800's, with the advent of oidium, began a new dark era for viticulture, followed by mildew and then phylloxera. These unlucky events did not influence the impulse towards the rebirth of Veneto's enology which was started in the past years. In 1876 was established the renowned School of Enology of Conegliano and in 1923 the Experimental Station of Viticulture and Enology. Thanks to the studies and the efforts of these two important institutes, it was possible to give a strong impulse to Veneto's enology towards the challenge of the 1900's which also favored the introduction in the region of international grapes, an event which did not affect the spreading of local grapes. After the 1950's - in Veneto as well as in other Italian regions - began a new future for enology and everyone understood the strategical importance of quality: a process which has strongly developed during the 1990's and still today is in progress.

Wines produced in Veneto are:

classified according to the quality system in force in Italy. The highest level of this system is identified as Dogg (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita, Denomination of Controlled and Guaranteed Origin) which includes a higher classification in case it is mentioned the subarea of production. The following levels are DOC (Denominazione di Origine Controllata, Denomination of Controlled Origin), IGT (Indicazione Geografica Tipica, Typical Geographic Indication) and Vino da Tavola (Table Wine). In Veneto are currently defined the following DOCG areas: Bardolino Superiore, Recioto di Soave and Soave Superiore. The current DOC areas of Veneto are: Arcole, Bagnoli, Bardolino, Bianco di Custoza, Breganze, Colli Berici, Colli di Conegliano, Colli Euganei, Gambellara, Garda, Lison-Pramaggiore, Lugana, Merlara, Montello-Colli Asolani, Monti Lessini, Piave, Prosecco di Conegliano-Valdobbiadene, San Martino della Battaglia, Soave, Valdadige, Valpolicella and Vicenza.

 Veneto and  Wine
 Veneto and  Wine
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 Veneto and  Wine
 Veneto and  Wine
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 Veneto and  Wine

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Aosta Valley

Publié le par Philippe Josse

Aosta Valley

Aosta Valley

Is an autonomous region with special status. Its administrative bodies have a wide range of Italian central government, not only in terms of regional policy, but also in other sensitive areas, strictly related to the economy of the Alpine region. In particular, local authorities have considerable autonomy in the management of water resources, hydropower, natural resources and agriculture.

Valle d'Aosta, the wine tradition is thousands of years. The vine is very probably arrived before the Roman legions, with trade. Of amphorae remains found in the necropolis of Aosta and back to the fifth century BC probably represent the first evidence of wine activities.

Repeated drop of wine due to famine and barbarians and Saracens during and after the fall of the Roman Empire stop in the Middle Ages: during this period, indigenous varieties are recovered and widespread. The introduction of traditional varieties takes place from the fifth to the eleventh century AD. It is at the end of the nineteenth Aosta Valley vineyard is the largest, with 3,000 hectares cultivated.

After the onset of diseases imported from America, the French and Piedmontese grape varieties are introduced significantly. From this period, there has been a gradual decline in the area planted to vine, until you get to only 500 ha in 2000. Then, the trend began to reverse.

Long located at the intersection of strategic military and trade routes between France, Switzerland and Italy, Aosta or the "Little Rome of the Alps" retains many traces of its history as:

The megalithic site of Saint-Martin-de-Corléans,

the triumphal arch of Augustus, the Roman gates Aosta Aosta's Roman theater can accommodate 4,000 spectators, and the amphitheater

Roman settlement, it then became part of the kingdom of the Franks, the Carolingian Empire and the Kingdom of Burgundy, and the states of Savoy before integration to Italy in 1860. However, it was part of the First Empire from 1800 to 1814 constituting the district of Aosta.

Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley
Aosta Valley

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Trentino-Alto Adige

Publié le par Philippe Josse

Trentino-Alto Adige

Trentino-Alto Adige

Or Trentino-South Tyrol is an autonomous region of northern Italy with more than one million inhabitants.

e Trentino Alto Adige, with borders with Switzerland and Austria, is separated into two distinct provinces. Trentino, around the city of Trento in the south, is historically Italian language and culture. Alto Adige, around the city of Bolzano in the north, is known as the South Tyrol, Austrian historically, and is officially bilingual German-Italian.

This is an officially bilingual region. In Italian it is called Trentino-Alto Adige-Südtirol in allemande Trentino. Ladin, which is the third official language in some eastern valleys, told Trentino-Südtirol.

The whole area was Austrian until 1919, when it was annexed to Italy after the First World War. The territory was renamed Venezia Tridentina. The Fascist regime tried to Italianize the German-speaking population, but without success. At the same time, he encouraged a massive Italian immigration.

The area is bordered by Austria (Tyrol North and East) north and Switzerland (Graubünden) in the extreme northwest. The south is bordered by Veneto and Lombardie.1

The terrain is mostly mountainous, marked by vertical forms of the Dolomites. However, large valleys penetrate the space. Those of the Adige and Isarco are wider and allow communication with the North. The Brenner Pass is the easy passage of the corridor to Austria and Germany.

In addition, the northern part of Lake Garda, the largest Italian lake, belongs to the Trentino-Alto Adige.

Trentino Alto Adige, the northern most region of Italy is mountainous and only 15% of the land is arable. The difficulty of raising vines on steep slopes and terraces encourages growers to focus on quality. And nearly three-quarters of production is DOC and most of the wine is exported.

The production of many varietals focuses on two DOC zones: Trentino south and Alto Adige in the north. The Alto Adige DOC hosts several types of wine: Colli di Bolzano, Meranese di Collina, Santa Maddalena, Terlano Valle Isarco and Val Venosta.

Although experts agree that the Alpine climate favors grapes to make white wine scented, it has historically focused on red wines that represent nearly two-thirds of the regional production.

The dominant grape in Alto Adige Schiava is the source of light, bright reds are popular in Germanic countries of the north. Most of them are considered the Santa Maddalena, high on the slopes overlooking Bolzano. The best known is the Caldaro produced from vines growing around the small lake of the same name, in volumes up to 15 million bottles per year.

Other wines from the Schiva are from the valley along the Adige River to the Trentino and Veneto in the name Valdadige. This applies to red wines and white wines quite popular. Other red show more class. The Lagrein grape, South Tyrol, and Teroldego, Trentino, are among the most distinguished northern Italy vines and contribute to the achievement of wines of a certain class.

Lagrein that grows in the plains along the Adige at Greis, a district of Bolzano, is a bright red, fruity and supple, very nice. The Santa Maddalena has already old a light red wine and fine reputation. Teroldego, raised in the plain north of Trento Rotaliano wine is quite attractive when young with some aging ability in good vintages. The Marzemino Trentino is a fresh and lively red wine to drink for any occasion.

The region also produces one of the best rosés from Italy, the most impressive being Lagrein Kretzer. The sweet Moscato Rosa with its graceful aromas of flowers, wine is a rare and prized dessert.

Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige
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Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige

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Lombardy

Publié le par Philippe Josse

Lombardy

Lombardy

(Italian: Lombardia in Lombard: Lumbardia) is a Italie septentrionale region south of Switzerland, in the east of Piedmont, west and north of la Vénétie of Emilia-Romagna. The city of Milan is the capital.

The area is 23,857 km2 and has a population estimated at 10,004,434 inhabitants, making it the most populous region of Italy.

During and after the fall of the Roman Empire, Lombardy was ravaged by a series of tribal invasions. The last and most significant was that des Lombards or Longobardi, who came to 570. Their long reign gave to the region, which was the capital Pavia, its current name. The Frankish nobility, Bavarian and Lombard talked close relations for many centuries. After initial arguments, the relationship between the Lombards and the Latin speakers were improved. Finally, the language and culture of the Lombards were assimilated with the Latin culture, leaving traces in many names, the Civil Code, laws, et cetera. The end of Lombard rule came in 774, when the Frankish king Charlemagne conquered Pavia and annexed le royaume Italy (mainly northern and central Italy) to his empire. The former Lombard dukes and nobles were replaced by other vassals, prince-bishops or marquises Germanic. The eleventh century was an important economic development in the region, due to the development of trade and mostly agricultural conditions. Similar to other regions in Italy, this development led to a better understanding of the city, whose wealth allowed them climbing to defy the traditional feudal supreme power, represented by the Germanic emperors and their local legates. This process reached its zenith in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, when different Lombard Leagues formed allied cities of Lombardy, usually led by Milan overcame the Hohenstaufen Emperor Frederick I at Legnano, and his little son Frederick II, at Parma.

Conquered in 1797 by Napoleon Bonaparte who turned in Cisalpine Republic, Lombardy (Lombardia) was made by the Congress of Vienna in Austria, which the association in the Veneto to form the Lombard-Venetian Kingdom.

In 1848, an uprising in favor Risorgimento managed to temporarily drive the Austrians from Milan. However, the very martial Marshal Radetzky, despite his 82 years, against-attacked. He crushed the forces of the Kingdom of Sardinia in the first Custozza and that of Novara and resettlement and Austria in northern Italy.

It was not until June 1859 that the Piedmontese strongly supported by the French managed to take over Austria at the battles of Magenta and Solferino. However on July 12, Napoleon III, made uneasy by the loss in his army, was quitting everything. At the armistice of Villa franca, he obtained the annexation of Lombardy to the Kingdom of Sardinia Victor Emmanuel II and Cavour in exchange for the Duchy of Savoy and the County of Nice to France and maintaining Austria Veneto.

Lombardy
Lombardy
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PIEDMONT

Publié le par Philippe Josse

PIEDMONT

PIEDMONT

Forty names are spread over an area of ​​62,000 hectares. Land of contrasts, there produces one of Barolo wines from Italy but also keeps the Asti Spumante, light, sparkling, sweet aromas of muscat.
Piedmont's climate is characterized by cold winters accompanied by fog, hot summers but not excessive and prolonged fall. This is why the nebbiolo, black grape maturity is late on its promised land. Particularly tannic wines that are produced soften late, beyond twenty times and have exceptional aging potential.

PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT
PIEDMONT

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