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Trentino-Alto Adige

Publié le par Philippe Josse

Trentino-Alto Adige

Trentino-Alto Adige

Or Trentino-South Tyrol is an autonomous region of northern Italy with more than one million inhabitants.

e Trentino Alto Adige, with borders with Switzerland and Austria, is separated into two distinct provinces. Trentino, around the city of Trento in the south, is historically Italian language and culture. Alto Adige, around the city of Bolzano in the north, is known as the South Tyrol, Austrian historically, and is officially bilingual German-Italian.

This is an officially bilingual region. In Italian it is called Trentino-Alto Adige-Südtirol in allemande Trentino. Ladin, which is the third official language in some eastern valleys, told Trentino-Südtirol.

The whole area was Austrian until 1919, when it was annexed to Italy after the First World War. The territory was renamed Venezia Tridentina. The Fascist regime tried to Italianize the German-speaking population, but without success. At the same time, he encouraged a massive Italian immigration.

The area is bordered by Austria (Tyrol North and East) north and Switzerland (Graubünden) in the extreme northwest. The south is bordered by Veneto and Lombardie.1

The terrain is mostly mountainous, marked by vertical forms of the Dolomites. However, large valleys penetrate the space. Those of the Adige and Isarco are wider and allow communication with the North. The Brenner Pass is the easy passage of the corridor to Austria and Germany.

In addition, the northern part of Lake Garda, the largest Italian lake, belongs to the Trentino-Alto Adige.

Trentino Alto Adige, the northern most region of Italy is mountainous and only 15% of the land is arable. The difficulty of raising vines on steep slopes and terraces encourages growers to focus on quality. And nearly three-quarters of production is DOC and most of the wine is exported.

The production of many varietals focuses on two DOC zones: Trentino south and Alto Adige in the north. The Alto Adige DOC hosts several types of wine: Colli di Bolzano, Meranese di Collina, Santa Maddalena, Terlano Valle Isarco and Val Venosta.

Although experts agree that the Alpine climate favors grapes to make white wine scented, it has historically focused on red wines that represent nearly two-thirds of the regional production.

The dominant grape in Alto Adige Schiava is the source of light, bright reds are popular in Germanic countries of the north. Most of them are considered the Santa Maddalena, high on the slopes overlooking Bolzano. The best known is the Caldaro produced from vines growing around the small lake of the same name, in volumes up to 15 million bottles per year.

Other wines from the Schiva are from the valley along the Adige River to the Trentino and Veneto in the name Valdadige. This applies to red wines and white wines quite popular. Other red show more class. The Lagrein grape, South Tyrol, and Teroldego, Trentino, are among the most distinguished northern Italy vines and contribute to the achievement of wines of a certain class.

Lagrein that grows in the plains along the Adige at Greis, a district of Bolzano, is a bright red, fruity and supple, very nice. The Santa Maddalena has already old a light red wine and fine reputation. Teroldego, raised in the plain north of Trento Rotaliano wine is quite attractive when young with some aging ability in good vintages. The Marzemino Trentino is a fresh and lively red wine to drink for any occasion.

The region also produces one of the best rosés from Italy, the most impressive being Lagrein Kretzer. The sweet Moscato Rosa with its graceful aromas of flowers, wine is a rare and prized dessert.

Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige
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Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige
Trentino-Alto Adige
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