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Friuli–Venezia Giulia

Publié le par Philippe Josse

Friuli–Venezia Giulia

Friuli-Venezia Giulia wine

(or Friuli wine) is wine made in the northeastern Italian region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Once part of the Venetian Republic and with sections under the influence of the Austro-Hungarian Empire for some time, the wines of the region have noticeable Slavic and Germanic influences.

There are 11 Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) and Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia area. The region has 3 Indicazione Geografica Tipica (IGT) designations Alto Livenza, delle Venezie and Venezia Giulia. Nearly 62% of the wine produced in the region falls under a DOC designation. The area is known predominantly for its white wines which are considered some of the best examples of Italian wine in that style.

Along with the Veneto and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, the Friuli-Venezia Giulia forms theTre Venezie wine region which ranks with Tuscany and Piedmont as Italy's world class wine regions.

Friuli–Venezia Giulia is Italy's most North-Eastern region. It covers an area of 7,858 km2 and is the fifth smallest region of the country. It borders Austria to the north and Slovenia to the east. To the south it faces the Adriatic Sea and to the west its internal border is with the Veneto region.

The region spans a wide variety of climates and landscapes from the mild Mediterranean climate in the south to Alpine continental in the north. The total area is subdivided into a 42.5% mountainous-alpine terrain in the north, 19.3% is hilly, mostly to the south-east, while the remaining 38.2% comprises the central and coastal plains.

The rivers of the region flow from the North and from Slovenia into the Adriatic. The two main rivers are theTagliamento, which flows west-east in its upper part in the Carnic Alps and then bends into a north-south flow that separates the Julian Alps from Alpine foothills and the Isonzo (Soča slo.) which flows from Slovenia into Italy. The Timavo is an underground river that flows for 38 km from Slovenia and resurfaces near its mouth north-west of Duino.

The region Friuli–Venezia Giulia has a temperate climate. However, due to the terrain's diversity, it varies considerably from one area to another. Walled by the Alps on its northern flank, the region is exposed to air masses from the East and the West. The region receives also the southerly Scirocco from the Adriatic sea, which brings in heavy rainfall. Along the coast the climate is mild and pleasant. Trieste records the smallest temperature differences between winter and summer and between day and night. The climate is Alpine-continental in the mountainous areas, where, in some locations, the coldest winter temperatures in Italy can often be found. The Kras plateau has its own weather and climate, influenced, mostly during autumn and winter, by masses of cold air coming from the North-East. These generate a very special feature of the local climate: the north-easterly wind Bora, which blows over the Gulf of Trieste with gusts occasionally exceeding speeds of 150 km/h.

Friulian: Friûl–Vignesie Julie, Slovene: Furlanija–Julijska krajina, German:Friaul–Julisch Venetien is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The capital is Trieste. It has an area of 7,858 km² and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia (known in English also as Julian March), each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity

Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
Friuli–Venezia Giulia
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